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Sheltering-in-Place: Day 145

This is a text based image. The text on the image reads BLACK LIVES MATTER AMPLIFY THEM fowokan.com Is there a need for magic and rituals that mediate between that which we have lost and that which we have become? —George Kelly AKA Fowokan

The text on the image reads

BLACK LIVES MATTER
AMPLIFY THEM
“Is there a need for magic and rituals that mediate between that which we have lost and that which we have become?”
—George Kelly AKA “Fowokan”

 

Fowokan's sculptures are sometimes realistic, sometimes stylized, and always alive.

Fowokan describes himself as an African born in the Caribbean. On a trip to Benin, Nigeria, he decided to become an artist. He was determined to become a sculptor and learned through trial and error. In his own words:

My work is rooted in the traditions of pre-colonial Africa and ancient Egypt rather than the Greco Roman art of the west. Coming to the visual arts late in life I deliberately chose not to be trained in western art institutions as I felt that these institutions could not teach me what I wanted to know. They were too deeply entrenched in their own traditions with little or no understanding or interest in the things that interested me most, which are the ideas that lie behind the art and culture of Africa....

The philosophical aspect came through a deep intuition and travels through various parts of Africa, exploring the spiritual side of my ancestral/ spiritual home; this was my art school, my university. The intuitive/spiritual aspect of reality still abounds in Africa. I believe that what is described as African art is not art in the western sense but creations associated with religion, magic and ritual.